I watched the end of the Corona Trial and noticed that our senators are OLD. The senate president is apparently over 70 years old. I wondered why they were still there. Maybe they just love what they do. But then I also wondered if they were teaching somebody younger to do what they do, to eventually take their place. Could it be that they’re still there because there’s no one capable to replace them or continue their work? If so, why not?

A couple of friends of mine are resigning from their jobs. I hear the same concerns. Who is going to do the work they’re going to leave behind? To achieve a good transition, another capable person (or one with potential at the very least) should be “attached” to them, so that the new person learns to do his/her new job efficiently, and the whole team or company doesn’t have to suffer (much).

I think basic discipleship principles are in order. The older politicians should be humble enough to take newbies, even those who are potentially AND actually better than them, under their wing and mentor them, teach them the ropes. Humble and secure enough, unafraid that their mentees will be greater than them one day. I know I know, the corrupt ones can do the same, but I believe they will ruin themselves eventually — sowing and reaping. But that’s even more reason for the good ones to step up. Share their passion, their vision for the country. Train the younger ones, show them past mistakes so they can avoid them. Listen to idealistic, new ideas, and learn from them. Similar practices might help companies as well.

This is exactly what discipleship is for me. We impart, teach, minister not so we can just do that per se, but to train them to be like us…no, better than us. We teach, they learn, they grow. We teach, we learn, we grow too! But we’re not going to be in our positions forever. We’re in Alabang now, but God could take us elsewhere. What happens to the work we started, to the people we minister to? Who will take over? While we are still here, we must already think about that. That’s why we push multiple anchoring (connecting with multiple leaders that they can go to for counsel, accountability, or just to hang with and learn from) and we encourage them to lead others as well. They teach, others learn, others grow. They teach, they learn, they grow too — hopefully ten times better than their predecessors.

So I challenge you! It doesn’t matter if you’re young or old, an employee, a boss, a student, a teacher, a student government official, a politician, a parent, a pastor, an assistant, a victory group leader, or the country’s president.  WHO’S NEXT AFTER YOU? Who do you plan to pass the baton to? Who are you training to do what you’re doing and to continue the legacy that you have started? Are you multiplying yourself? Are you letting your “apprentices” fly, allowing them to make mistakes and learn from them, but continually supporting and mentoring them? Are you showing the way, preparing the way, and then getting out of the way?

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About Phoebe Torres-Lucero

I am Phoebe Torres-Lucero, wife of a loving husband & dedicated pastor, King, and mother to three wonderful, smart, active little girls, Danae, Noelle and Gianna. Phoebe means bright and radiant. Torres means towers. Lucero means light. Put together, my name speaks of a tower of bright, radiant light. And that is what I hope to be as I write and share with you some of my experiences, especially on being a mom.

2 responses »

  1. Edrei says:

    YES! YES! YES!

  2. RAVR says:

    There are many elders-but no young takers- most are too impressed by their internet knowledge..but they lack wisdom.

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